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Posts Tagged ‘focused improvement’

The Benefits of Implementing FI

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010
Written By: Lee Oxton

Focused Improvement is the process of applying systematic problem solving methods to manufacturing. The process relies on aligning the correct method to the correct scenario. When a known solution exists to a problem clearly demonstrated, the rigour and analysis to find this solution is not needed as experience can be used to try the solution when it is not too expensive or difficult to implement. If such a solution is expensive or difficult to implement, the rigour and analysis of the problem must be improved. The basis of solving problems uses the 5G’s:

 

Whenever problems are solved, all 5G’s are used but the 1st G – Gemba must always be studied to check our assumptions are correct. For simple problems it is possible to use Gembutsu, Genjitsu, Genri & Gensoku based on experience as explained above to create solutions which are not too expensive or difficult to implement. The study of Gembutsu and Genjitsu can be made systematic. This has 2 benefits, firstly it gives a common method to all the people across an organisation on how the facts and physical evidence are recorded and used. The second benefit is that systematic problem solving gives a common language to all levels in the organisation on the facts and physical data to create a common understanding of the problem. KCTS uses the method known as 5W+1H to create a repeatable, systematic problem statement by asking the following questions and summarising the answer.

• What product is related to the problem?
• When did the problem occur during the activities of the manufacturing enterprise?
• Where on the product and / or within the process was the problem created?
• Who has more of these problems compared to their peers?
• Which trend can be seen over time? Is the problem getting worse or better or repeating in alignment with other factors?
• How is the problem physically manifesting itself?

The remaining G’s of Genri & Gensoku can be studied if experience does not reveal the causes of the problem once the 5W+1H problem statement has been created. If the immediate causes are understood, root cause can be found. Root Cause is defined as when the problem affects human behaviour, it is not suitable to continue through the reasons for this first human behaviour unless this is the original reason we are investigating. It is also not suitable to stop the investigation until this human behaviour has been found. If a problem occurs due to physical problems within the workplace, why are these physical problems not being resolved? The use of 5 Why analysis allows us to test the detail of our 5W+1H. If we have not found the root cause by asking Why 5 times and validating the possible responses to demonstrate factually the reasons for the problem, the problem statement requires more study of the facts and data. If the root cause is found earlier than 5 Why’s then we may stop the analysis at that step.

Once the root cause is found, the benefits of Focused Improvement come from implementing a solution that eliminates that cause. Once eliminated, the problem cannot reoccur. There will be other problems occurring within the process and areas studied, but the same problem cannot reappear unless the conditions of the area change.

The application of Focused Improvement in companies across the world has given direct benefits to the places where it has been implemented, plus allows time and attention to be focused on the systems needed to stop the problem reoccurring. Systems and processes are needed to control the human behaviours used within all manufacturing enterprises but such processes require improvements. By focusing on facts and data, the opinions which can often divide organisations are removed and thus logic is used to drive decision making which ensures all standards used become the latest, best standard.

Focused Improvement Problem Solving

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

Details on our 5 Day Training Course for Focused Improvement Major Kaizen.

Course Content:
•    Theory and practical application of Focussed Improvement techniques for resolving chronic or complex factory     problems.
•    Roles and responsibilities of a Focussed Improvement project team member.
•    Experience of either leading a teams and / or effective team working.
•    Understanding of Phenomena statements, Principles and Parameters, Measurement, Documentation, Communication & Root Cause Analysis (5 Why), Risk Assessment and Configuration control.

Course Benefits:
Candidates will gain theoretical training and practical experience of how to lead and complete a focussed improvement project and a good understanding of the Focussed Improvement methodology.

Course Overview:
This is one of the higher level WCM training courses run as an integral part of the WCM TPM programme within an organisation. It is designed to build on other Total Productive Maintenance experiences and provide the skills and knowledge to help solve more complex or chronic site problems. The Course is designed to create focussed improvement practitioners who can lead (or be involved in) Focussed Improvement projects in their own Plant and support the implementation of WCM.

Comments:
Candidates will be continually assessed / coached during the course. A written examination on the final day to check understanding is normally set based on the organisations discretion. Delegates who fail may be given an oral examination to clarify their understanding of the course.
The Course is normally residential on a factory site and run over 5 days (Monday to Friday inclusive) this excludes any travelling time.
To reinforce the knowledge gained on the course and to deliver benefits for their own site, delegates are expected to lead and complete a focused improvement project in their own factory within 100 days of returning from the course. Immediately following the course, the host site Black Caps are expected to complete the course FI projects and implement the solutions.
The Course normally has places for up to 12 delegates although larger courses are possible by negotiation.  Delegates are usually ‘not’ from the host site due to the amount of course preparation / supervision.

Problem Solving Training

Monday, March 22nd, 2010
Written by: Lee Oxton

Focused Improvement Activity Board

Last week we successfully completed a problem solving project in the Netherlands. Our brief was to eliminate a reoccurring defect on a 1400 tonne injection moulding machines using Focused Improvement, which is part of the Total Productive Maintenance methodology.

KCTS trained 5 of the client personnel to practitioner standard in Focused Improvement which enabled the project to be completed with savings of €10,000 per year. The newly trained practitioners also completed another problem solving project in the same week resulting in an extra saving of €5,000 per year. Also as part of the course, the largest Customer Complaint issue on the 800 tonne injection moulding machine was eliminated.

Course Overview

Focused Improvement Standard Kaizen is one of the middle level WCM training courses run as an integral part of the WCM TPM programme within an organisation. It is designed to build on other Total Productive Maintenance experience and provide the skills and knowledge to help solve more complex site problems. The Course is designed to create focussed improvement practitioners who can lead (or be involved in) Focussed Improvement projects in their own Plant and support the implementation of WCM.

 

 

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