Lean Training Consultancy.

 

Posts Tagged ‘kcts’

TPM Principles & Application

Saturday, June 11th, 2011

Back in 2009, KCTS starting blogging about Total Productive Maintenance which has been a core system within KCTS since it started in 1998.

Read it again below:

TPM Principles & Application

What is it?

TPM means Total Productive Maintenance. TPM is about involving everyone in creating and sustaining the necessary standards in their own areas. The standards must continually challenge the organisation to get better results as fast as possible.

A number of techniques are used to get the involvement and change in standards which are needed to deliver better results.

The techniques are often shown as a “TPM Temple”. This demonstrates that the techniques all aim to reduce Losses & Wastes, often measured by OEE, and apply to any organisation no matter the structure or products. Each technique has a number of Key Steps which need to be done to get the involvement and change in standards which are needed to deliver better results. The techniques focused upon within this programme are:

•    Focused Improvement, also called Continuous Improvement or Kaizen
•    Autonomous Maintenance
•    Professional Maintenance, also called Condition Based & Planned Maintenance
•    5S, also called Workplace Organisation
•    TPM Loss & Waste programme including OEE, Overall Equipment Effectiveness

Other techniques which may be applied as part of TPM are:
•    Safety, Health & Environment, reducing accidents, illness & emissions
•    Training & Education, improving consistency and delivery of knowledge
•    Early Management, improving the way new products and process are introduced
•    Quality Maintenance, reducing quality problems
•    TPM in Administration, involving people who work in offices and helping change standards in the offices to deliver better results

TPM aims to reduce losses to ZERO. This can be an extremely tough target for some losses, but ultimately satisfying for the people where the losses occur when achieved.

When to use it?

Identification of the type of problem can help work out the plan on how to solve it. Autonomous Maintenance and Professional Maintenance can eliminate sporadic problems by getting reliability back into the process, the area or the activities. Quality Maintenance will improve reliability of the process further to reduce quality defects. Other parts of TPM that can eliminate chronic problems include Focused Improvement, 5S Workplace Organisation and Training & Education.

What does it achieve?

Ownership of problems is only possible when people within the area, or activity, where the problem occurs can be involved in its elimination. TPM focuses people on creating and updating standards to share learning and tackle common problems. TPM delivers results faster than tackling problems in an unstructured way.

TPM aims to reduce losses to ZERO.

Key steps:

1.    Visit the area, or observe the activity, and investigate the problem
2.    If the problem relates to Safety, Illness or Emissions, select Safety, Health & Environment techniques to eliminate the problem.
3.    If the problem occurs regularly, every shift or every day or every week the problem is Chronic
4.    Select Focused Improvement, 5S or Training & Education when there are Chronic problems
5.    If the problem occurs regularly, every month or every year or every few years the problem is Sporadic
6.    Select Autonomous Maintenance and Professional Maintenance or Quality Maintenance as an improvement tool when there are Sporadic problems.
7.    Visit the area, or observe the activity, and check the problem has been eliminated

Variations:

•    Most people do not mind changing, but most people mind being changed. The way that people are involved is crucial and standards must be written by those who work within the area, or activity. These standards must be communicated and reviewed by the other people who also work within the area, or activity.

Have you created your Daily Schedule?

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

Written By: Paul Steven – KCTS Consultant

Recently I have returned to classic Time Management as a way to improve my Value Added to Non-Value Added ratio. I found that I am lacking the self discipline to ignore the interesting but ultimately Non-Value Added activities that were part of my routine, I needed a system to help me. Of course, systems are consistent to my vocation as a Lean Consultant, so Time Management, and specifically my 100 Day Planning Handbook, became part of my daily life.

 

 

The first habit was to keep it with me, thanks to colleagues and customers I have not lost the physical handbook yet. Despite my efforts to leave it on my desk, in meeting or on public transport, I still have it with me all the time. Secondly, I had to get into the routine of ensure planning my days, reviewing my action completion, and even rating my days via the “Moodometer”.

This is now a consistent habit as I work on Week 4. My challenge this week is to use my Daily Schedule. This presented a dilemma, as working as a Lean Consultant, each day is different. Some days I may be delivering problem solving with a leadership team, but equally I might be teaching theory & practise to a mixed group, or participating in TPM activities with operators and technicians, or presenting to executives, or coaching leadership techniques one-to-one or even delivering e-learning to hundreds of participants. How can I write a Daily Schedule? Words of wisdom came from our MD, I should concentrate on the generic activities rather than the specifics to build my version 1.

I have blocked routine times for my regular NVAR activities and I am now realistic about my current Value Adding activities each day. I have my previous 4 weeks of data to judge my estimating skills. They started extremely over-optimistic but quickly became too conservative and now include minimum & stretch targets daily. So my version 1 Standard Diary is as follows:

  • Take kids to day-care (when not travelling)
  • Emails & planning adjustment
  • Electronic Daily Stand-Up Meeting (E-DSUM)
  • 1st Delivery of VA
  • Coffee, calls & mental break
  • 2nd Delivery of VA
  • Lunch with time outside of the factory/office
  • Emails & re-planning, plus administration (expenses, printing, postal)
  • 3rd Delivery of VA
  • Coffee, Twitter & mental break
  • 4th Delivery of VA
  • Coffee & mental break
  • Emails, Twitter, calls
  • Review of Delivery & Plan for Tomorrow

 

This is still version 1, but by using a Standard Diary I know I can experiment and improve or return to current-best-standard as needed. The question is whether I can keep the rigour of looking at emails only 3 times per day. If you’re using a Standard Diary, please let me know how you’re getting on.

Top 5 things to do when launching a Planned Maintenance programme

Thursday, February 10th, 2011

Written By: Stephen Ellis – KCTS Consultant

For those maintenance or production personnel contemplating introducing a planned maintenance programme, here, in no particular order, are the top 5 things to do:

1. Do you have the Leadership ‘will’ and commitment towards planned maintenance? To launch a planned maintenance system it will require resources – time, people, materials, systems. It will also require patience and persistence. Planned maintenance does NOT yield immediate results. It is important that the leadership understand:-

a. Why they have to have a planned maintenance system?

b. How to use a planned maintenance system to ensure it delivers effective results?

c. How to develop and create a planned maintenance programme?

2. Do you have a list of assets? To perform planned maintenance you need to understand your asset population and the detailed equipment information about each asset.

3. Where should you focus your planned maintenance resources and effort? With limited resources you will need to focus your resources based on priorities and need. Do you have any data or experience of what goes wrong, or where the risks are?

4. Do you understand the elements of a planned maintenance system – focus equipment and safe access to equipment, capable and available labour resources, available tools and materials, work standards and reporting, work scheduling, work and system review.

5. Do you have the necessary skills:-

a. To manage the planned maintenance system. Do you have to create the system? Is the system created? For both of these questions different skills are required.

b. To apply the planned maintenance tasks. Do you have the relevant skills to perform typical planned maintenance tasks – condition inspection, replacement, setting, calibrating, adjusting etc,?

If you would like to know more about how you can improve your planned maintenance programme effectiveness, please contact us.

Are you using Self Assessment Audits to drive your success?

Thursday, February 3rd, 2011

Written By: Paul Steven – KCTS Consultant

To control the quality of your products it is necessary to have an excellent understanding of the processes within your business. How are you judging your process performance?

Judging process performance of your systems can be measured externally and give you benefits, and it can be measured internally and give you different benefits. External audits can be objective, observation based and external audits measure a process compared to proven practices and experience. Internal audits can allow a much deeper understanding of the health of a process by assessors who use the process as part of their daily life.

Self Assessment is the process of allowing you to use a standardised audit to measure your process against an aspiration. Externally supplied Self Assessments allow you to measure your own progress against industry-standard aspirations or philosophical aspirations. Internal Self Assessments, especially when written yourself, allow you to measure the success of a process against internal aspirations.

Recently I have had the privilege to work with a customer on converting an external Self Assessment, supplied by KCTS, into an internal Self Assessment aligned to the company’s aspirations for the next 2 years. This allowed the language of the audit to be altered and the direction given by the company to be woven into the questions. This particular Self Assessment dealt with 5S, a subject close to my heart, and related to whether the process was truly embracing the Plan-Do-Check-Act philosophy needed to sustain and improve 5S within the workplace. My customer was at first keen to include specific documentation audits as a way to assess the success of the 5S processes, but as we discussed 5S processes and Plan-Do-Check-Act the need to evolve the processes became evident. This internal Self Assessment must look for the evidence of delivery of the process more than restricting it to a documentation checklist. Self Assessment allows reflection on whether the processes or the personalities are driving successes.

The resulting internal Self Assessment also has clear scoring criteria to allow every person within the area to understand and judge their current performance within the process. Targets are being agreed to ensure the audit is progressive. Self Assessment requires discipline to ensure that the score does not rise based on a need to show progress as openness must be the priority whenever Self Assessment is deployed.

To summarise, external assessment allows you to be compared to others but when written correctly Self Assessment allows you to compare yourself against your own aspirations.

Which Step of Your CI Journey Are You On?

Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

“7 Steps of Every Change”

Written By: Paul Steven – KCTS Consultant

How is your business coping with the challenge of introducing dramatic improvements today? Are you familiar with the 7 Steps of Every Change? Do you know how to use these steps to deliver the change you want in your business? You can learn here how to use them quickly and effectively for results starting today.

The “7 Steps of Every Change” can be described in many ways, but countless companies rely on navigating through their changes successfully using the following interpretation.

  1. Unfreeze the complacency, by demonstrating the urgent need for change
  2. Create Change Agentswho have a common Vision & measureable Objectives
  3. Communicate “Every Day in Every Way” about the change
  4. Generate Quick Wins to associate the change with success.
  5. Include & Grow the number of people involved in the change
  6. Deliver the Full Plan including its difficult actions (80+20) before Step 7
  7. Refreeze the standards (written or social) but include a way to challenge

 

The first part of using the “7 Steps of Every Change” is to unfreeze the complacency within your business for continuing as it is now. If there is no urgent, emotional, driving need within the business for this change to occur, business inertia will stop the change dead in its tracks. The logical reasons for the change may be clear and demonstrable, but the burning desire to change needs to be lit around the business. You must target key Stakeholders but include everyone related to the change.

Once key Stakeholders are emotionally engaged in changing, they need help delivering. Change Agentsare people aligned to a Vision of the business after the change, they are the people ready to get involved and make the change happen. You need make sure the team of Change Agents have a common Vision and measureable Objectives. Their alignment is crucial to the success of your change.

Change Agents make things happen and people like to hear about those successes. People actively want to participate in successful, interesting and honest change. This is why communication, generating quick wins and including & growing the number of people involved in the change is a virtuous circle. This circle is formed around the concepts of challenging, learning & applying and sustaining.  Steps 3, 4 & 5 are the enablers to ensure Step 6 is possible.

You may have been taught about the Pareto Rule than 80% of the outcome is often controlled by 20% of the actions. It is tempting to only implement those 20% of the actions and move on. When you deliver the full plan, the ability to sustain become apparent. The actions with no merit should not be included in any plan, but actions which deliver the full change correctly and honestly will pay dividends in the culture of your business. Before the standards related to a change are refrozen, you must conclude the plan.

Refreezing the standards and culture of your business after the change requires another emotional content. A celebration, however modest, is needed to allow people to reflect on the actions completed, the changes delivered and the new ways. As changes become a necessary cycle of all business, when refreezing you must put in place systems to allow challenge within the business. The next unfreeze will be needed at some time in the future.

Start today with unfreezing any of your complacency of what can and cannot change. You’re then one step closer to continuous improvement becoming “normal” culture. Kaizen is improving a little everyday and keeping that improvement you made.

KCTS Resource Issue 10 – October 2010

Thursday, November 18th, 2010
Written By: Daniela Silvani

 

Don’t forget that the October Issue of the KCTS Resource has been released and is available to read via the Downloads section of the KCTS Website: In this issue we take a look at Value Stream Mapping how best to use it in your workplace, a foundation stone to any Lean Improvement Programme.

There is also the regular features, including; a couple of Lean/TPM puzzles to test your mind; a Case Study on using Focus Improvement for our client in their Zevenaar factory, The Netherlands; and we’ll be catching up with KCTS consultant, Stephen Ellis, and finding out what he has been up too over the last 6 months.

Also our free downloads this month include the ‘Safety Hazards and Hazardous Substances’ and ‘Safety Authority and Escalation’ knowledge sheets. Plus you will be able to download the PDF of this month’s KCTS Resource, all for Free!

KCTS Resource Issue 9 – July 2010

Friday, July 9th, 2010

We have just released the July Issue of the KCTS Resource: In this month’s issue we’ll be taking a look Risk and Risk Assessment and Health and Safety in the workplace, as well as, how Overall Equipment Effectiveness can be a foundation stone to any Lean Improvement Programme.

There is also the regular features, including; a couple of Lean/TPM puzzles to test your mind with; a Press Release about the success of Instructor Course 13 which happened over in China; a Case Study on using SMED for our client in their Zevenaar factory, The Netherlands; and we’ll be catching up with KCTS consultant, Malcolm Newman, and finding out what he has been up too over the last 6 months.

Also our free downloads this month include the ‘Targets Settings & Sharing’ and ‘Business Performance or Local Measures’ knowledge sheets, and List of Risk worksheet. Plus you will be able to download the PDF of this month’s KCTS Resource, all for Free!

KCTS Resource Issue 8 – May 2010

Monday, June 14th, 2010
Written By: Lee Oxton

Don’t forget that the May Issue of the KCTS Resource has been released: This month we’ll be delving in to the benefits of implementing Focused Improvement into your factory.

We’ll be taking a look at our M.I.C.K system, from its conception as an idea back in 2006, and how it has benefitted both KCTS and our clients by adding an extra problem solving tool to help discover the causes of why chronic and sporadic problems occur.

As well as all this we’ll have our regular features for you including; Some Lean/TPM puzzles to test your thinking power; a Case Study on a Standard Kaizen course we did in Chang Zhou, China; a Press Release about our new video podcasts we launched last month; and we will be Meeting KCTS consultant, Paul Steven, to take a look at what he has been up too since last time we met.

Our free downloads the month include our Using Standards in TPM and Defect Detection & Prevention knowledge sheets. And sticking with the Focused Improvement theme, we have a Focused Improvement activity board Template and a Clarification of Phenomena worksheet. Plus you will be able to download a PDF of this month’s KCTS Resource, all for Free!

KCTS Resource Issue 8 – May 2010

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010

We have just released the May Issue of the KCTS Resource: This month we’ll be delving in to the benefits of implementing Focused Improvement into your factory.

We’ll be taking a look at our M.I.C.K system, from its conception as an idea back in 2006, and how it has benefitted both KCTS and our clients by adding an extra problem solving tool to help discover the causes of why chronic and sporadic problems occur.

As well as all this we’ll have our regular features for you including; Some Lean/TPM puzzles to test your thinking power; a Case Study on a Standard Kaizen course we did in Chang Zhou, China; a Press Release about our new video podcasts we launched last month; and we will be Meeting KCTS consultant, Paul Steven, to take a look at what he has been up too since last time we met.

Our free downloads the month include our Using Standards in TPM and Defect Detection & Prevention knowledge sheets. And sticking with the Focused Improvement theme, we have a Focused Improvement activity board Template and a Clarification of Phenomena worksheet. Plus you will be able to download a PDF of this month’s KCTS Resource, all for Free!

Ask Us a Question

Tuesday, April 13th, 2010
Written By: Lee Oxton

We recently had a number of people sending in questions through our free ‘Ask Us a Question’ service, so this is a good opportunity to remind everyone of exactly what this is;

We provide this unique free online service so that users can have direct access to a resident business consultant, and can email us a question that will be answered within 4 hours. The KCTS business consultants have very diverse backgrounds, providing training and advice that spans across a wide variety of industries, both in manufacturing and service.

Our job is all about helping other companies to become more efficient and remain competitive and we achieve this through the training and coaching of a number of improvement tools such as; Lean, Total Productive Maintenance and Six Sigma.
We ultimately assist organisations in the Master planning and creation of initiatives which are driven by loss & cost reduction and have found that our knowledge and advice is well respected in these circles.

By offering this online service we can now assist in, and take, all types of questions relating to Continuous Improvement, Lean Processes, Six Sigma and Total Productive Maintenance methodologies, not just from our clients but from anywhere.  We wanted to offer a free-to-use practical sounding board, and a best practice advisory service, where anyone can contact us with a question and we can reply back with little or no fuss whatsoever.

The Ask Us a Question Service is available from our website, all you need is an email address so that we can reply to your question.

 

 

KCTS Ltd © 2009. All rights reserved. Use of this website signifies your agreement to the Terms of Use.