Lean Training Consultancy.

 

Posts Tagged ‘lean principles’

Quick Wins from 5S

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

Written By: Paul Steven – KCTS Lean Consultant

5S has many specific definitions for each “S”. I prefer, Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardise & Sustain. All five should be applied together in sequence using Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) to drive a virtuous circle of improvement. PDCA means that rather than gaining perfection in a single cycle of 5S, success is found by repeating and learning from 5S through using it everyday. 

5S may be introduced by itself, but for quick wins I suggest you include the introduction of Standardised Work in conjunction with your 5S programme. Standardised Work is a subject entire books are written to describe and I shall endeavour to discuss it regularly whilst I blog. But as a start, the principle behind Standard Work is that if all people complete repetitive tasks in the same way each time they complete it and describe their methods so that others can do it identically then everyone who follows that method will have the same problems in executing it perfectly. Describing the method including symbols, drawings and photographs it is known as Standardised Work. As we strive for perfection in the method we can try to both understand and solve the problems involved in reaching perfection. Every time we solve a problem, we update the Standardised Work with the improved method and train everyone who uses it to ensure the maximum benefit from the improvement is felt. It is the fastest way to create a learning organisation where everyone’s problem solving is targeted for everyone’s benefit. Let’s look at how 5S and Standardised Work can compliment each other.  

When applying Sort for the first time you can have a number of benefits quickly whether using Standardised Work or nor. In addition to the removal of obviously unneeded items and engagement of allowing people to set their own standards at work, the biggest opportunities come from red tagging. Red tagging can be done using actual red tags or anything that you agree identifies items which may not be required. At the moment of tagging we just don’t know if the item in question is needed. The red tagging is your opportunity to deal with the item. In some simple but effective 5S programmes, the red tags will be cleared by quick discussion some that should be kept are disposed of and many that are not required will be kept, and perhaps shared to other departments within the organisation. This can form part of the virtuous circle of PDCA, but for a quick win from Sort you should use your Standardised Work to drive removal of red tags. The red tags should be kept or disposed of based on whether the items are mentioned within the Standardised Work. 

By having Standardised Work where all tools and necessary materials are accounted for, the red tagging leads to either faster removal of unnecessary items or improved Standardised Work. If you don’t have any Standardised Work, you should start writing how to work in an area whilst applying Sort as it helps you know what items are needed. Although you start writing the Standardised Work during Sort, as all 5S are introduced sequentially but together the Standardised Work will also be visualised during Set in Order. 

Once you try to remove any item using red tagging and Standardised Work, the real use of that item is quickly revealed. The item may now need to be included within a revised Standardised Work document or it inclusion agreed through a trial, or the item may need disposal and the proven standards reinforced. Whatever the outcome, if positive discussion and experimentation is used in the spirit of PDCA, progress is being made towards perfection. We are ensuring only that which is required within the workplace is kept within the workplace by applying Sort. Plus, we reinforce Standardised Work and continue to highlight problems which in turn can be solved by ensuring only needed items are kept in an area. As more problems are identified and solved, everyone benefits – KPI’s increase and work satisfaction improves as we strive for perfection in Standardised Work by eliminating problems.

Value Stream Mapping

Wednesday, March 10th, 2010

Details on our 3 day training event for Value Stream Mapping

Features:
•    Proven methodology.
•    Focus on knowledge transfer from trainer to site.
•    Material delivered by experienced trainers.
•    Development of Current and Future State map.
•    Development of Action Plan.
•    Completion of ‘Waste Walk’.
•    Facilitation of a company Value Stream Map.
•    Training based on a real-live site project.
•    Bespoke templates and worksheets supplied to use in your own future projects.
•    Practical exercises to enable rapid learning in real environments.
•    Can be delivered in modular format to suite availability.

Benefits:
•    Completion of your very own  Value Stream Map.
•    Delegates learn to talk the Language of ‘Lean’.
•    Show your manufacturing facility in a way not seen before.
•    Map out processes to identify and reduce bottle necks.
•    Indentify the areas of operational waste within your organisation.
•    See opportunities for improvement.
-    Reduce costs
-    Optimise capacity
-    Improve customer satisfaction
•    Prioritise improvement activities through the identification of your Value Stream.

Overview:
•    Introduction to ‘Lean’ Methodology
•    Benefits of adopting ‘Lean’ principles
•    Concept of Value Added / Non-Value Added
•    7 Deadly Wastes
•    Project selection (product/process)
•    Current State Mapping
•    Future State Mapping
•    Takt time and improvement tools
•    Implementation Planning

Designed to teach you how to devise and sustain a Value Stream Mapping (VSM) project, the purpose of which is to develop your company’s Current and Future State maps for a product line. From this we will assist you with the creation of your Implementation Plan. The Implementation Plan will identify immediate cost savings that can be made through the application of Value Stream Mapping.

Delegates who have little or no prior knowledge of the subject matter are welcome to attend this training. Through a mixture of simulation and practical project work the course will give employees the necessary tools and techniques to be able to go on and complete their own VSM project.

Due to the strategic nature of this event we recommend that support is granted from site management in order to drive the indentified improvement projects forward. This would come from having an overall responsibility for a factory or workplace improvement programme, or be in an operational management position within a manufacturing or process environment.

Designed to teach you how to devise and sustain a Value Stream Mapping (VSM) project, the purpose of which is to develop your company’s Current and Future State maps for a product line. From this we will assist you with the creation of your Implementation Plan. The Implementation Plan will identify immediate cost savings that can be made through the application of Value Stream Mapping.

Delegates who have little or no prior knowledge of the subject matter are welcome to attend this training. Through a mixture of simulation and practical project work the course will give employees the necessary tools and techniques to be able to go on and complete their own VSM project.

Due to the strategic nature of this event we recommend that support is granted from site management in order to drive the indentified improvement projects forward. This would come from having an overall responsibility for a factory or workplace improvement programme, or be in an operational management position within a manufacturing or process environment.

 

 

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